DJ Steve Aoki Brings His Made-in-Japan Dim Mak Collection to New York Fashion Week: Men’s

Photo: Courtesy of Dim Mak

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Photo: Courtesy of Dim Mak

Steve Aoki—the globe-trotting DJ and music producer—has “something new in the wheelhouse.” Enter: Dim Mak Collection, a streetwear line splinter of his Dim Mak record label and events production company, which he founded in 1996. If today’s presentation was an indicator of what Aoki is capable of, in terms of branding and buzz, then he may soon be just as recognized for his skill with a sketch pad as for his talent behind the turntables.

“I’ve been screening T-shirts since I was 15,” said the man backstage before his presentation pushed off. “To be able to do this now, in this way, it took a while but it’s what I’ve always wanted.”

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Photo: Courtesy of Dim Mak

Aoki has produced four collections so far for Dim Mak Collection—they were all made with the “specific” Japanese market in mind (Dim Mak Collection is developed and manufactured in the country). He’s going to keep his design team in Japan for now, though he chose to show a wider range lineup at New York Fashion Week: Men’s in order to get in front of—and entice—American eyes.

And what Aoki sent out will doubtlessly appeal to a cross section of the young and the cool—such is his proven magic. His aesthetic is a unique mix of nightclub-y, skate-centric, Los Angeleno, and generally energetic cues (and was further informed today by the Beat Generation and ’70s-era New York), with results that are a little eccentric but not so much that they alienate. The clothes had all of these hallmarks. See: a long khaki trenchcoat with contrasting black laces (replete with a bullet-wounded form by the artist David Choe printed on the back); trousers with double belting; an MA-1 with a slight puffiness and an even slighter iridescence; and coordinating black-and-gray plaid work suits with neon yellow accenting.

Aoki was especially thankful for the CFDA allowing him to debut in the U.S. under his own terms. “We’re using skaters, not models,” he said. (They rode a temporarily installed half-pipe while the band Mangchi performed.) “We want to make it legit, but also, we want to do so in our own way.” He has our attention.

 

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How to Fend Off Beard Dandruff

The skin under your beard is often brittle and dry. Here’s the best way to exfoliate, cleanse, and moisturize to prevent the onset of beard dandruff.

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Moving in Together? The Freak-Out-Free Guide to Decorating Your Space

Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, October 2013

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Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, October 2013

The lease is signed, you’ve handed in the keys to your old pad, and your boxes are packed. But before you can settle into cohabiting bliss, you may still have a few hurdles to overcome. “Decorating is such a stress point for couples,” says New Orleans–based interior designer Sara Ruffin Costello. “When you’re decorating rooms, it’s like working on any job together; you’ve got to come together, and there’s going to be lots of compromises. The quicker you enter the program like that, the less blow-ups there will be.” With that in mind, here are some tips on how to peacefully primp your new space—without meltdowns.

Get on the Same Page Financially
Moving in together can be a serious test for how well couples will work together in the financial realm. To avoid any financial surprises, map out a master budget for decorating your new space—and stick to it. If your dream lounge chair is too pricey, circle back to it a year from now—you can always upgrade staple pieces in the same color palette.

Purge, Purge, Purge
“I would rather have a hole where a table should be than a table I don’t want to look at,” says Costello. “I think the most liberating thing in the world is to have the equivalent of a yard sale, which allows a couple to actually go out and hunt together, rather than be saddled with a lot of things they don’t want.” Take inventory of your items together, making note of special keepsake pieces you’d never want to toss. “There are things you want to keep that are sentimental and have these wonderful narratives associated with them,” says Costello. “Those things make a couple’s apartment.” Not digging the dresser he’s had since childhood? Have a calm conversation about potentially repurposing or sprucing up pieces headed for antique status. Remember: a new coat of paint can go a long way!

Determine Your Mix
With dozens of decorating aesthetics available at our fingertips, it’s no wonder couples often struggle to get on the same style page. “The options are dizzying,” says Costello. “Do I want it to be total French? Should we go Swedish modern? Who you want to be on Tuesday is sometimes not who you want to be on Saturday.” Costello advises couples to pick and choose pieces and styles that bring out their best selves individually—then blend. “As any decorator will tell you, the beauty is in the mix,” she says. “There’s a way to blend two different styles—let’s say, hyper-feminine with the man-cave look. These two can blend together really well, if you pick and choose correctly; it’s a wonderful balance. If there’s too much man cave, it’s out of balance—like the yin and the yang—it’s a wonderful thing when both styles are taken with measured consideration.”

Start With the Sofa
The focal point of almost any entertaining space can also be a serious investment, not to mention a major point of conflict for just-moved-in couples. “In many cases, sofas need to be jettisoned because most people’s starter sofas aren’t that great, and it’s a fun thing to buy together,” says Costello. “It really sets the tone for the rest of the room, so I like to start fresh.” After you’ve established the desired look and feel of your new place, begin shopping for a new sofa—and take your time. If well-maintained, this staple item can last you and your beau over a decade, so it’s important to agree on its shape, size, and overall look before hiring movers.

Stick With “Non-Color” Walls
“Color transcends gender in so many ways because it can cut in either direction, but white is typically a safe bet,” says Costello. “White, cream, ecru—any of that—levels the playing field.” To keep rooms feeling gender-neutral, Costello advises couples to stick with strictly light or dark colors for their walls. “With those non-color colors, you can weave in a palette that is masculine and feminine,” she says. For more zest, be sure to add pops of color in the form of accent pillows, wall art, and decorative items around your space.

Make Your Presence Known—Slowly
Moving into your (already established) lover’s place? Make your presence known, but be sure to wield your sword lightly. “Start with something small, like the bed linens,” says Costello. “This is someone’s home. You don’t want to all of a sudden put your stamp on it and steamroll. That’s a great way to break up immediately.” Rather than zeroing in on what you don’t like about your partner’s space, focus on first adding small items that will bring you both joy. “I think the greatest relationship advice is don’t sweat the small stuff, so I apply it to decorating together as well,” says Costello. Above all else, if you find yourself in a decorating stalemate, sleep on it. Your new roommate will thank you for it.

 

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The 23 Best Over-the-Knee Boots for Under $500

Photo: Getty Images

We’ve got Gigi Hadid to thank for kicking the over-the-knee-boot craze into overdrive. It was about a year ago when the model was first spotted in a pair of Stuart Weitzmans pulled up over skinny jeans, and since then she’s sported her now-signature shoe with everything from ribbed sweater dresses to denim cutoffs. Clearly, the all-occasion style is an accessory worth investing in. But for many, the steep price tag is enough to give the whole idea, well, the boot. And understandably so. Which is why we’ve pinpointed 23 alternatives to help you dip a toe into the trend without digging too deep into your pockets.

Featuring lace-up closures and a block heel, Dune’s Sibyl boots will stack up next to Hadid’s, while setting you back just $115. Flat devotees can get a leg up on the look with Toga’s stretch-leather Pulla boots, which boast Western-inspired buckled hardware. Looking to take the trend into a totally new direction? Try on Giuseppe Zanotti’s Melissa for size in rich chocolate brown with gold metal detail. And considering they’re marked at $275 (down from $1,128), they’re a stylish steal. In other words, run—don’t walk—to shop these and others in the slideshow above.

 

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Comfort Food for Trying Times: Julia Turshen’s Soul-Warming Chicken Soup

chicken soup

Beloved chef Julia Turshen has helped write some pretty legendary cookbooks in her time (Buvette, The Hot Bread Kitchen Cookbook, The Fat Radish Kitchen Diaries, and Gwyneth Paltrow’s It’s All Good, to name a few), but her best book yet may be her own. Since its release last September, Small Victories was named one of the best cookbooks of Fall 2016 by The New York Times, and for good reason—the easy-to-follow prose reads like a lesson in the kitchen taken with your best friend over some tea.

One favorite recipe from the classic cookbook is Turshen’s Aunt Renee’s Chicken Soup, named after the author’s dearly departed aunt. “It is unequivocally my favorite food in the world,” explains Turshen. “The small victory here is not just carrying on traditions, but also learning how to make a good chicken soup; because in doing so, you learn to make chicken stock—the backbone (no pun intended) for so many things in the kitchen. You can put a whole chicken directly in the pot, but I like to separate it so that the white meat is easy to retrieve early on and, also, the whole pot is easier to stir during cooking.”

Like so many of the best chicken recipes, the below recipe is unbelievably versatile, and makes the perfect base for everything from classic chicken noodle to more variations, like a spicy Thai version or Italian Wedding. Really whatever suits your mood—chicken soup for the soul, indeed.

Simmering Stock

Simmering Stock

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Simmering Stock

Photo: Courtesy of Chronicle Books

Aunt Renee’s Chicken Soup

 

Ingredients
One 4-lb (1.8-kg) chicken, cut into 8 pieces (2 breasts, 2 wings, 2 thighs, and 2 legs), backbone reserved
1 lb. (455 g) chicken wings
2 large yellow onions, unpeeled, roughly chopped
4 celery stalks, roughly chopped
1 head garlic, halved horizontally so that the cloves are exposed
A handful of fresh Italian parsley sprigs, stems reserved and leaves finely chopped
1 T black peppercorns
Kosher salt
8 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch (5 cm) pieces
3 quarts (2.8 liters) water
2 parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch (5 cm) pieces
A handful of roughly chopped fresh dill

Instructions
1. In the largest pot you have, combine chicken pieces, chicken wings, onions, celery, garlic, parsley stems, peppercorns, and 1 tablespoon salt. Add half of the carrots to the pot and cover with the water. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer and cook, skimming off and discarding any foam that rises to the top, until the chicken breasts are firm to the touch, about 25 minutes.

2. Use tongs to remove the chicken breasts from the pot and set them aside in a bowl. Continue simmering the stock, stirring it every so often and skimming any foam that rises to the top, until everything in the pot has given up all of its structural integrity (the vegetables should be totally soft and the chicken should look well past its prime—this is all great, it means these things have given all of their flavor to the water) and the stock is a rich golden color, about 3 hours.

3. While the stock is simmering, let the chicken breasts cool to room temperature, and then discard the skin, remove the meat from the bones (discard the bones), and shred the meat. Set the meat aside.

4. Ladle the stock through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean pot (or, if you don’t have another large pot, ladle it into a bowl, clean the pot you started with, and return the stock to the pot). Discard the contents of the sieve (everything in it will have given all it can by this point).

5. Bring the stock back to a boil and season to taste with salt (be bold, it will need quite a bit!). Add the remaining carrots and the parsnips, lower the heat, and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.

6. Add the reserved chicken breast meat to the soup and let it warm up for a minute or two. Ladle the soup into bowls, and top each with some of the chopped parsley and dill. Serve immediately.

Note: This soup is even better the next day. Do not discard the hardened fat that will have formed on top after the soup has been refrigerated. According to Turshen, “the rich pools of chicken fat on top of your soup are essential.”

Spin-offs:
Italian Wedding Soup
Leave out the parsnips and extra carrots and save the cooked chicken breasts for something else. Poach little meatballs in the soup and wilt in some chopped escarole right before serving. Each bowl should get lots of grated Parmesan cheese.

Thai Chicken Soup
Add a large piece of crushed fresh ginger, a bunch of scallions, some cilantro stems, and a chopped chile to the broth. Adjust the water to 10 cups (2.4 liters) and add a 13 1/2-ounce (398 ml) can of full-fat coconut milk. Leave out the parsnips and extra carrots and simply serve the broth with the shredded chicken. Top with sliced scallions and cilantro leaves.

Chicken and Vegetable Soup
Simply add whichever kinds of vegetables you like to the strained broth (with or without the parsnips and extra carrots). Add the shredded white meat or save it for something else, like chicken salad sandwiches. Some of my favorite combinations include diced beets and shredded red cabbage (stunning!), finely diced leeks and roughly chopped potatoes, and shredded savoy cabbage with chopped tomatoes. Serve with grated Parmesan.

 

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