Jennifer Aniston on Her Biggest Beauty Regret—And Why Easy Always Does It

jennifer aniston

Two decades have passed since Jennifer Aniston burst onto the scene and became a reigning ’90s beauty icon, thanks to that shining blonde hair and sun-kissed skin captured weekly on Friends. Since then, the 47-year-old actress has kept the preternatural glow and easygoing charm that made her a star, but more recently, has seen her life head in a new direction. There was her quiet marriage last summer to director Justin Theroux, coming on the heels of her Golden Globe–nominated turn in Cake, which let Aniston flex her acting and producing chops. With another dramatic role and production credit in American war film The Yellow Birds planned for later this year, plus her status as a burgeoning beauty powerhouse—as co-owner of Living Proof and the longtime face of Aveeno—that momentum is only growing. Here, she takes a moment to discuss her skin-care secrets, her biggest beauty regret, and why she’s thrilled that the ’90s are back.

How has your philosophy about beauty changed over the years?
Emotionally and mentally, I would say it’s just about loving yourself and loving what you’ve been given—to really appreciate it and take care of it. Because this is the only body we’re given, we need to be really good and mindful of what we eat and how we take care of our skin—getting a good night’s sleep is extremely important, as is hydrating with water, water, water. It’s so important to getting that extra glow.
 
You have such a signature look. Did you go through any memorable hair or makeup phases along the way to finding it?  
Sometimes you learn the hard way. Sometimes what’s in fashion isn’t always your best friend. There was a phase in the ’80s where I don’t think anyone was sporting good hair and makeup. The amount of makeup I piled onto my skin and the wonderful hair colors and cuts that my hair went through—I don’t look back fondly on some of those choices. But I do laugh at them!

What do you regret most from that period?
The entire decade! I would have to say, there was a period where I cut my hair really, really short. It was long on top, short on the sides. I think right above the ears—about an inch above—I shaved my head, and that was kind of a really bad look. It was like a faux kind of chicken shit mohawk [laughs].

Still, the ’90s are coming back in a big way and—
The ’90s are coming back!? Why are they coming back, that’s mean. I’m just kidding. That’s really good because I have certain things I have yet to throw away from my days on Friends. My red squared-toe loafers might actually be making a comeback, that’s awesome. See, it’s coming back—I knew it. I also have those nice high-waisted jeans. I’m so glad I didn’t throw any of those out. I loved the ’90s.

Looking back at what you’ve learned over the years, what lessons have you applied to your routine now?
I think over the years, everything’s just continued to get simpler. Less is more, less makeup, less fuss, and just more natural, which I kind of prefer. My skin-care treatment is very simple. I’ve found that anytime I try to do some kind of fancy hair or makeup routine or skin-care routine, it gets more complicated. I love simple Aveeno products—they just came out with a new Absolutely Ageless night time cream and a new night time serum, which are wonderful. It’s important to find something that’s simple and affordable—and easy.

 

The post Jennifer Aniston on Her Biggest Beauty Regret—And Why Easy Always Does It appeared first on Vogue.

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Disney Goes Haute With a New Kenzo Collaboration

Kenzo

Welcome to the jungle—the jungle, that is, as envisioned to want-it-now effect with Kenzo’s new The Jungle Book collab. Ahead of a live-action-meets-uncanny-CGI remake premiering next month (featuring the voices of Bill Murray, Idris Elba, Lupita Nyong’o, et al), the Parisian house has teamed up with Disney to create a sizable ready-to-wear capsule of cheeky pieces for men and women. Marrying archival Kenzo florals with art from the beloved 1967 original movie, the styles are right in step with the runways’ current taste for tropicalia—and the new life the Hawaiian shirt has enjoyed in recent months among plentifully tatted male models, et al.

Kenzo creative directors Humberto Leon and Carol Lim headed into the cornucopic Disney archives, uncovering beautifully gestural sketches from the animated film. “It was incredible,” says Leon. “We were able to [watch] some never-before-seen segments of the original movie, and seeing the process behind their creation was the most exciting part of this collaboration.” Bearing heady, Technicolor prints of Mowgli, Baloo the bear, and co., styles like silk twill dresses and poplin buttondowns, capture—at even a glance—a bit of the magic that made the animated feature so beloved. Says Leon of the mark it made on him as a child: “The Jungle Book has always been my favorite Disney movie because it resonated with my fear of being alone. I love the spirit of independence and conquering fear.” Among our favorites of the collection is an insouciant riff on the Kenzo tiger logo sweatshirt featuring Shere Khan the tiger. Kenzo and Bergdorf Goodman, the collaboration’s exclusive U.S. retailer, will fete the movie, as well as BG’s forthcoming Jungle Book windows, with an intimate cocktail and screening next week. In the meantime, tide yourself over with a first look at the clothes here.

Kenzo x The Jungle Book, available from April 1 exclusively at Bergdorf Goodman, and from April 7 at kenzo.com.

 

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Artist Lorna Simpson Returns to Her Favorite Subject—Hair—With Exclusive New Works

lorna simpson earth & sky

 

In a video currently playing in the Art Institute of Chicago’s “Nothing Personal” exhibition, two women silently and simultaneously perform their morning rituals, their skin-care and makeup routines and hairstyles providing clues to their social roles, their place and time. The work is by New York–based artist Lorna Simpson, who has spent much of her nearly 40-year career exploring visual identity—namely the language of hair. Take, for example, Wigs, where a long blond tumble of curls hangs bodiless on a white backdrop, nearby a stretch of braid is neatly coiled just below a frothy cloud of disembodied afro; or Twenty Questions, which features four gelatin silver prints of an obsidian bob shining against equally dark skin and the collar of a soft white tank top—between each image, plaques propose interpretations, from “Is she as pretty as a picture” to “or sharp as a razor.”

From the sprays of updos in Stereo Styles to the chronologically organized ropes of braids in 1978–88, Simpson seems to suggest that if we wear our history, it’s on top of our heads. From birth, the texture and color of our hair alone speak volumes about centuries of heritage, while length and style become culturally coded symbols of sex, location, musical preferences, and professions. “Hair is a cipher of identity,” said Simpson over the phone recently, speaking about her fascination with the material. “I had questions about representation and what we learn about the subject.”

They are questions she leaves open-ended. Without a voice and often faceless, Simpson’s portraits instead confront us, the audience, with our own preconceived notions about race and gender as they’re tied to beauty, a theme that became more prominent in her later collage work, in which found photographs of anonymous African American women (and occasionally men) were stripped of their original coifs and surrounded, instead, by swirls of Simpson’s free-form ink paintings that she has likened to Rorschach tests. There, the forward-facing gazes seem to ask, “Who do you think I am?” and “Why?”

Now, her subjects are more liberated than ever. Above, in a new exclusive series for Vogue.com, Simpson has lifted the faces of 12 women from “very mundane” ’60s and ’70s advertisements in Ebony magazine—the culture and politics monthly she grew up with that “informed my sense of thinking about being black in America”—and paired them with illustrations of geological and astrological forms from a 1931 textbook. Stripped of any fundamental context, the women provide no origin story and no identifying characteristics. The geometric shapes replacing their hair weren’t chosen for their resemblance to, say, Nefertiti’s crown or Erykah Badu’s emerald head wrap—references that may spring to mind as you look at them—but rather for the same reason you might cut, color, or change the texture of your hair: simply because, says Simpson, “I thought they were beautiful.”

 

The post Artist Lorna Simpson Returns to Her Favorite Subject—Hair—With Exclusive New Works appeared first on Vogue.

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All Those Millennials Can’t Be Wrong: Why Depop Just Might Change the Way You Shop

depop

Dita Von Teese is selling strappy lingerie on it. Shaquille O’Neal uses it to pawn off basketball memorabilia. Jayne Min uses it to sell Céline tunics and Manolo Blahnik mules. Yuki Haze just copped a pair of Mercedes emblem earrings and necklace off it, and my colleague, photo researcher Alexandra Gurvitch, won’t stop talking about how she’s trawling it for a vintage version of this season’s fur-collared coat from Balenciaga. I’m talking about Depop, the buzziest e-commerce app in the United Kingdom, which is amassing a low-key fan base in the United States that’s steadily becoming, well, way less low-key.

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app

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Jayne Min

Photo: Courtesy of Jayne Min / @stopitrightnow

Founded in 2011, Depop is a thrift-shopping oasis for millennials, with all of the charm of Etsy (duds dripping with naughties flair, throwback streetwear, outré vintage pieces, very reasonable prices) combined with an addictive interface that references—what else?—the double-tap attention-grabbing sinkhole of Instagram. On Depop, users can “like” pieces, message each other to haggle, and leave comments on items listed by their fellow users. You have the option to follow friends, celebrities, or strangers, so as to be among the first to find out when they post new wares. It’s basically Instagram, but instead of celebrities subtly hawking props in sponsored posts, it’s the conversation around the piece that is really the point. “The community aspect and the interface lets us stand out between our competitors,” says Depop’s PR director James Meredith, and it has created a buy-and-sell space that’s far more fun than sitting at home alone on your computer waiting to snap up something from eBay. “I think we have the right product and product that people want to see, especially with the younger generation.”

The network also resonates with the authenticity-first mindset of the digital generation: Personality is highlighted in many of the listings. The description for a velvet halter posted by Kurt Gooch, whose Depop handle is @icomebearingthrifts, reads “Not sure if this belonged to a professional skater or just a bomb person with a sequin fetish,” while a pair of silk trackpants with “Spoiled” emblazoned on the butt is described by Isabella McFadden (who operates under @internetgirl) thusly: “U would def be envious of [these] if u saw during Recess in grade school. & they are silk track pants so super cozy, which is always a plus.” Internet-speak may be at a premium, but for users like Gooch, who has been using Depop for a year, the online outlet feels like a place where he can fully be himself. “The Depop community is very positive and accepting of all people,” says Gooch. “I’m a dude who wears dresses and skirts on Depop and all I’ve gotten is acceptance and love from the Depop community.”

Shaq

Shaq

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Shaquille O’Neal

Photo: Courtesy of Shaquille O’Neal / @buyitfromshaq

McFadden has a following of more than 73,000 on Depop, which is slightly more than her Instagram. She’s recently decided to take a year off from university to focus on selling clothes. She finds the direct messaging aspect essential to Depop’s success: “It is very personal,” says McFadden. “It is easy as texting. You’re just, like, talking back and forth, like, ‘Do you think this will look good with this?’ You’re in contact with these people and it is casual and it is personal and it is easy.”

The model seems to be working: Just last year Depop raised eight million dollars attempting to break into the United States market. They’ve also reeled in big-in-the-blogosphere names like Leandra Medine and Chiara Ferragni. But for Meredith, the real appeal is still in the personal touch. “Shaq is on! He’s cool. Every single photo is a selfie. He’s selling old magazines and anything he’s been in.” And that’s not all: “Apparently when you buy something from him he gives you a call,” says Meredith. Customer service with a millennial touch doesn’t seem so bad after all.

Yuki Haze

Yuki Haze

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Yuki Haze

Photo: Courtesy of Yuki Haze / @yukihaze

 

The post All Those Millennials Can’t Be Wrong: Why Depop Just Might Change the Way You Shop appeared first on Vogue.

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This Fashion Insider Builds Her Wardrobe Around an Epic Jewelry Collection

Fallon Nachmani

For Grayscale PR founder Fallon Nachmani, personal style is less about trends and more about investment pieces that can transform any look—particularly jewelry. Her agency specializes in lesser-known jewelers from around the world, including the U.S., Brazil, and Lebanon, so she knows a thing or two about upgrading a minimal outfit with avant-garde extras. Whether she’s spending a day in her Tribeca office or attending a black-tie event, she relies on statement earrings, a classic watch, or a cluster of bracelets to pack a punch—sometimes all of them at once.

Her approach to her job is specialized, too. After a decade of working in the industry, she noticed that designers—particularly young and emerging designers—wanted a more intimate, hands-on PR experience. That means she’s constantly working on fresh concepts for her clients, from traditional press to collaborations and parties. Transitioning her look from day to night is key—here, she tells Vogue.com how she does it.

A Minimal Uniform With Statement Add-Ons
My everyday style is a mix of simple, neutral clothes with colorful jewelry and accessories. My favorite color combination is probably all-white with my blush Acne Studios Foin coat—outerwear is always my favorite part of an outfit! My Acne leather jacket is also a staple, and I’ve been wearing my Céline Bam Bam ankle boots almost every day. When I was at Paris Fashion Week last month, I bought a pair of Gucci loafers with pearl-studded heels, which are surprisingly versatile—I’ve been wearing them with dresses, jeans, and wide-leg pants.

Fallon Nachmani

Fallon Nachmani

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Photo: Courtesy of Fallon Nachmani

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David Webb ring, $6,800, davidwebb.com; Chloé chunky-knit wool sweater, $1,650, net-a-porter.com; The Row Folina slim-leg stretch-cady trousers, $650, matchesfashion.com; Acne Studios mock leather biker jacket, $1,485, matchesfashion.com; Gucci leather mid-heel loafer, $1,100, gucci.com; Hermès Maîtres de la Forêt silk twill scarf, $395, hermes.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of davidwebb.com; Courtesy of net-a-porer.com; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of Gucci; Courtesy of Hermès

Luxe Day-to-Night Upgrades
Since I don’t have time to go home and change after work, I typically transition my workday look for evening with jewelry and shoes. I keep an extra pair of Céline heels under my desk, and I always have my clients’ jewelry collections at the office, so it’s very convenient to borrow one of their pieces! I’ll add a large earring, like my favorite onyx drops from Ara Vartanian, a collar necklace from Mizuki, or an amazing diamond lariat by Deborah Pagani. Starting with a great dress makes it even easier—I love visiting Fivestory on the Upper East Side. My friend Claire [Distenfeld] has the most amazing taste, so it’s a one-stop shop.

Fallon Nachmani

Fallon Nachmani

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Photo: Courtesy of Grayscale PR / @grayscale_pr

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Altuzarra tie-dye asymmetric button-front dress, $2,295, neimanmarcus.com; Monique Péan red fossilized dinosaur bone with white diamond pavé oval ring, $9,980, moniquepean.com; Ara Vartanian onyx turquoise black and white diamond earrings, $17,770, editorialist.com; Lizzie Fortunato large stonewear serving bowl, $110, lizziefortunato.com; Ara Vartanian octopus ring, price upon request, for information: ara.com.br; Ara Vartanian whip earring, price upon request, for information: ara.com.br; Rolex Oyster Perpetual timepiece, price upon request, for information: rolex.com; Mizuki Keshi white pearl open cuff, $2,350, stoneandstrand.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of Neiman Marcus; moniquepean.com; Courtesy of editorialist.com; Courtesy of lizziefortunato.com; Courtesy of ara.com.br; Courtesy of ara.com.br; Courtesy of Rolex; Courtesy of stoneandstrand.com

Working in Multiple Time Zones
Typically, my mornings begin with a coffee and email check, as many of my clients are overseas in Europe, Lebanon, and Brazil. Then I’ll either head to a breakfast meeting (my favorites are Sant Ambroeus in Soho or Little Park in Tribeca, near my office!) or to Equinox for a quick class before heading into work.

My typical workday consists of brainstorm sessions in the office, editor meetings, phone calls with clients, and a lot of emails. Whether I’m sending out information on a new store opening, pitching a collection launch, or visiting a designer’s studio, every day is different, and that’s what excites me.

A Nontraditional Approach to PR
I worked at several agencies in New York for ten years prior to starting my own. I’ve always loved and focused on fine jewelry and accessories, so it was natural for my agency to prioritize those areas. But I’m interested in design, art, and travel, too, so I’ve also incorporated a few of those brands into our roster—I recently signed Gentle Monster, a Korean eyewear brand; Tokyobike, a Japanese bicycle company; and Le Sirenuse, a beautiful hotel privately owned by the Sersale family on the Amalfi Coast.
I think the traditional PR agency model has changed, and designers are looking for a more hands-on, flexible, and nontraditional model—especially when it comes to fine jewelry.

Fallon Nachmani

Fallon Nachmani

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Photo: Courtesy of Fallon Nachmani

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Gentle Monster Kaiser BRD1 sunglasses, $190, gentlemonster.com; Philip Crangi chain with horseshoe charm, $850, philipcrangi.com; Sophie Buhai everyday egg pendant, $550, modaoperandi.com; Selim Mouzannar Istanbul Collection diamond and blue sapphire earrings, $2,235, for information: selimmouzannar.com; Noor Fares rhombus pinkie ring, price upon request, for information: noorfares.com; Noor Fares Amore Cabochon ring, $8,840, fivestoryny.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of gentlemonster.com; Courtesy of phillipcrangi.com; Courtesy of modaoperandi.com; Courtesy of selimmouzannar.com; Courtesy of noorfares.com; Courtesy of fivestoryny.com; Courtesy of gentlemonster.com

 
Taking Style Cues From Mom
My dream growing up was always to move to New York and work in the industry—I used to cover my walls in tear-outs from all of my favorite magazines! My Ukrainian mother was also a major inspiration for me—she always brought home amazing finds from her weekly trips to New York, and I loved watching her try on pieces from Jil Sander, Chanel, Prada, Dries Van Noten, you name it. Her jewelry was always very classic, though—tennis bracelets, diamond earrings, small gold hoops. Those are items I wear every day now, and then I’ll mix in something more experimental.

Fallon Nachmani

Fallon Nachmani

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Photo: Courtesy of Fallon Nachmani

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Rachel Comey indigo denim slim legion pants, $225, avenue32.com; Charlotte Chesnais petal silver and gold-plated earrings, $503, matchesfashion.com; Deborah Pagani mini pill pendant necklace, $4,240, barneys.com; Acne Studios Valda wool- and cashmere-blend coat, $1,415, matchesfashion.com; Saint Laurent French moccasin in black and white leather, $695, ysl.com; Fendi smocked-front cotton-poplin top, $1,456, matchesfashion.com; Sophie Buhai Mepplethrope silver cuff, $1,200, net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of Barneys; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of Saint Laurent; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of avenue32.com

A Lifelong Obsession With Jewelry
Jewelry-making is an art form. I believe in the power of gemstones and the energy they give off. The relationships designers and jewelers have with stones and the process behind creating a piece is endlessly fascinating to me. Also, many of the traditional jewelry houses and brands are family-owned, so the techniques are passed down for generations. That creates a very unique dynamic that requires trust, respect, and love of the craft. Jewelry is very sentimental, too, of course: Every piece evokes a memory.

Mixing Classic and Cutting-Edge Pieces
As far as my favorite jewelers go, I have to start with JAR, who is an absolute genius—I think he may be the greatest jeweler of our time. David Webb is an American icon, and his jewelry continues to inspire as the house reintroduces some of his vintage pieces. And Van Cleef & Arpels creates absolutely timeless, whimsical, and magical high jewelry.

Many of the designers I work with now are among my all-time favorites, too. Ara Vartanian is a Brazilian jeweler based in São Paulo who makes the most incredible one-of-a-kind pieces. He uses very special stones and unconventional settings, like two- and three-finger rings, hook earrings, and inverted diamond studs. I love Mizuki’s baroque pearls, and Noor Fares creates really imaginative and playful crystal jewelry. Selim Mouzannar is a French-Lebanese designer whose colorful jewels set in rose gold are inspired by Beirut, and have a very feminine touch. When I do wear fashion jewelry, Lizzie Fortunato’s statement earrings are a go-to.

Fallon Nachmani

Fallon Nachmani

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Photo: Courtesy of Industry Standard / @industrystandardny

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Gap true wash slim-fit shirt, $40, gap.com; Fernando Jorge Stream Lines 18-karat gold earrings, $2,750, net-a-porter.com; Van Cleef & Arpels vintage Alhambra necklace, $11,100, vancleefarpels.com; J.Crew slim broken-in boyfriend jeans, $115, jcrew.com; Monique Péan fossilized jet cuff, $3,600, moniquepean.com; Tabitha Simmons Leticia black splitsuede sandal, $625, tabithasimmons.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of Gap; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels; Courtesy of J.Crew; Courtesy of moniquepean.com; Courtesy of tabithasimmons.com

Collecting Future Heirlooms
Unsurprisingly, some of the most treasured items in my wardrobe are accessories—Hermès silk scarves from my mother-in-law, a Rolex Datejust watch I got for my birthday, a Philip Crangi yellow-gold horseshoe pendant necklace that my husband bought me for good luck, a vintage YSL pin-striped blazer, and a pair of ’90s-era soft yellow Jil Sander pumps that my mother gave me.

Transitioning to a Spring Work Uniform
Once the weather warms up in New York, I’m going to be rotating through white shirtdresses, a Proenza [Schouler] off-the-shoulder top, Altuzarra’s green tie-dye button-front dress, and accessories—obviously! I’m definitely investing in a new pair of Gentle Monster sunglasses, plus Tabitha Simmons sandals, and Céline ballerinas. I wish I could wear Chloé’s Fall collection right now—I already have the shag haircut, and I loved all the long, lightweight dresses and little neck-scarves. And I’d love to add more Gucci to my wardrobe, particularly those ’80s sunglasses and ankle socks.

 

The post This Fashion Insider Builds Her Wardrobe Around an Epic Jewelry Collection appeared first on Vogue.

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