Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: Willow and Jada Pinkett Smith Do Mommy-and-Me Fashion

Photo: Courtesy of Willow Smith / @willowsmith

It was clear from Instagram this week that in the Pinkett-Smith household the apple certainly doesn’t fall far from the tree where style is concerned. First, Chanel ambassador Willow and her mother, Jada Pinkett Smith, slipped into the Ritz Paris for Chanel’s Métiers d’Art show this Monday, practically twinning in darkly romantic black looks. And while you could barely tell the two apart, the fashion-forward mom-and-daughter team put their own individual spins on the nearly matching ensembles. As Willow’s caption explained, her fur was faux compared with her mother’s plush option. Across the pond, Willow’s brother, Jaden, was taking the British Fashion Awards by storm. Receiving the New Fashion Icons Award on behalf of him and his sister, the budding fashion plate could hardly contain his excitement over his win. The teen lost his cool in style as he jumped playfully on his hotel bed as Joan Smalls laughed along with him.

Nicki Minaj celebrated her birthday this week, and was more than composed in an Atlanta hotel room sporting a rainbow bright Chanel Boy bag that matched her own Day-Glo minidress.. Meanwhile, Zendaya was repping New York with an easy swag and a denim-on-denim look, replete with a fresh pair of Nike high-tops. Pharrell Williams broke broke out his punk jeans for an in-studio photo-op. Since Williams is back to making beats, we’re guessing the look is a nod to his new sound. Time will tell, but his rebellious spirit may have rubbed off on model Dree Hemingway, who rocked a riot grrrl–inspired ensemble of a vintage tee, lace skirt, and studded boots for Coach’s Pre-Fall show.

 

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A Feminist Reading of La La Land

Photo: Dale Robinette

WARNING: SPOILERS ABOUND. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK.

La La Land, director Damian Chazelle’s critically beloved new film, is at first glance a story as glossy, dreamy, and surface-level glam as the city for which it’s named. Chazelle’s cinematic world, all primary colors and musical interludes, is one where the mundane—a traffic jam; the eternal quandary of whether to go out or veg out—can spark a wildly over-the-top song-and-dance number. As a tribute to Hollywood’s golden age of movie musicals it captures the nostalgia and optimism of that era in film. As a love story, it’s transporting, a charismatic, wistful duet between stars Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling (who are not, I should note, particularly good at singing, but it works).

If you want my topline impression, it can be summarized as: Go see La La Land; you will be very entertained and at least a little moved, and Chazelle’s shiny vision is a great, much-needed diversion from the gritty, less-than-buoyant real world.

I’m not here, though, to go on about that. I’m here to talk about what runs beneath that burnished surface, which seems to me a strong current of gender critique. Is Damien Chazelle channeling his inner feminist in La La Land? I’m going to argue yes.

Stone is Mia, an aspiring actor stuck working as a barista at the coffee shop on the Warner Brothers lot, sneaking away on the regular for terrible auditions with distracted, unimaginative casting directors, and slowly losing confidence in the talent that made her leave behind her backwater birthplace in Boulder City, Nevada, for the bright lights of Hollywood. Her problem, the film asserts at various points, is that she’s too dependent on external validation (then again, she’s an actress).

You know who’s not at all dependent on external validation? Gosling’s Sebastian, a disgruntled jazz pianist whose purist notions of how jazz must be played and heard is very much not in keeping with the freedom and experimentation that drew him to the form in the first place. Sebastian scrapes by—and chips away at his soul—playing Christmas carols at cocktail bars, while dreaming of opening his own club, which he plans to call Chicken on a Stick even though that’s obviously a really bad name. (Oh, yeah, La La Land can be really funny; that’s another reason to go see it.)

It takes a series of meet cutes—in said traffic jam, at said Christmas-themed cocktail bar, at a pool party—before it’s obvious to these two frustrated romantics that they should probably just fall in love. And that they do: Cue a montage of happy, halcyon summer days, then cut to the weather, and their ardor, cooling. La La Land is organized seasonally, and by autumn, there are more than a few hints that there’s trouble in paradise.

As my colleague, exiting our screening, wondered: Will Ryan Gosling ever get a happy ending? The answer is still no. La La Land, as its whimsical title suggests, is a film about dreamers. But is there room enough for two dreams in one relationship? Nope, Chazelle seems to be suggesting.

Pursuit of their individual ambitions ultimately costs Mia and Sebastian their future together. To make money to open his club—and possibly to show his girlfriend that he can man up and get a real job—Sebastian joins a kind of terrible jazz fusion band fronted by John Legend, signing on to a Sisyphean cycle of recording, touring, recording, and touring. “When are you done?” Mia asks naively. The answer is basically never. Meanwhile Mia stays home slaving over her one-woman show, and bristles at the suggestion that she accompany her boyfriend on the road to make their relationship work.

Is there any simpler way to portend a feminist awakening than a one-woman show? I think not. Like whatever makes a butterfly finally emerge from its chrysalis, Goodbye Boulder City, Mia’s monologue, springs her from a life of barista-ing and humiliating auditions. The early reviews may be negative—enough to send her running back to the womb/Boulder City—but ultimately the producers come a-knocking.

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Photo: Dale Robinette

So by the end of their romance, our two heroes are at an impasse, Mia destined for a big role on a film shooting in Paris, and Sebastian’s now the one left behind to “get my own thing going.” They take a wait-and-see approach, but we all know what that means.

La La Land ends five years in the future. Mia is a big star, the kind who has her face plastered on billboards. She’s also a mother and a wife, though not Sebastian’s. Instead she married that guy from That Thing You Do (Tom Everett Scott), who seems to be there mostly to play the role of supportive house-husband and hunky red carpet escort. One night they go out and wander into a jazz club that just so happens to be the one Sebastian finally got it together to open (thankfully named Seb’s, not Chicken on a Stick).

Kind of a strong move to show up in black tie with your husband at your ex’s newly opened jazz club and leave him no choice but to perform for you, no? As Sebastian plunks out the opening notes of the song previously established as “their song,” Mia enters a fugue state, a Sliding Doors–style trance in which she envisions a life that might have been, the road not taken.

Does she daydream about the compromises they might have made? What if they had just waited for each other? What if she had joined Sebastian on the road? What if she helped him open his club?

No, this is a fully feminist fantasy: Mia imagines Sebastian coming with her to France, whiling away his hours playing Parisian jazz clubs. She imagines herself pregnant with their child, painting the nursery walls pink. When the baby is born, he seems to be a boy. Why the pink nursery? Why not.

In this dream, Sebastian doesn’t get the club, but he does get the girl. Mia, on the other hand, gets everything she wanted. It’s her fantasy after all, but in a film that’s all about the power of not giving up on your dreams, it seems that we should take note.

If nothing else, I like that Chazelle leaves us there. A little on the nose? Perhaps, but that’s musicals for you. As the director told Vogue’s John Powers: “Musicals are in a way the most truthful genre because they’re emotionally truthful. They’re about how the world makes us feel, not how it actually is.”

 

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One of San Francisco’s Most In-Demand Facialists Debuts a Skin-Saving Product Collaboration

facials

Despite the fact that she hand-mixes many of the masks and flower essences applied during her in-demand treatments, facialist Kristina Holey has never aspired to make her own products. “It’s super expensive, the market is so saturated, and I know how much work it would entail,” the Bay Area aesthetician says. But nine months ago, something happened that changed Holey’s mind: She started seeing a rise in perioral dermatitis among her clients.

The red cystic acne that occurs around the jaw is often due to a hormonal imbalance in women who go off birth control, are in their first trimester of pregnancy, or have just given birth, Holey explains. “Dermatologist-prescribed topical steroids clear up the dermatitis, but they also suppress immune function,” she continues, which can result in a loss of micronutrients that leave the skin’s barrier weakened—and vulnerable to pathogenic bacteria and inflammation. So while the prescription drugs will work for a few weeks, “the dermatitis comes back with a vengeance.”

When a longtime client came to Holey’s atelier looking for an alternative topical solution, Holey was compelled to consult product formulator Marie-Veronique Nadeau, the creator of the organic skin-care line Marie Veronique, whose Berkeley-based store had become a favorite beauty haunt for Holey. “We both have this weird passion for skin and we were just on the same page in terms of how we approach it,” says Nadeau, who launched her popular green beauty brand on the back of a cult-favorite tinted chemical-free zinc oxide sunscreen in 2002. “My approach has always been: ‘How would nature do this?’ ”

With clean, nontoxic, non-irritating ingredients in mind, the two women started testing different remedies targeting the skin’s barrier function (the top five layers of the stratum corneum) while also addressing inflammation. After a number of trials, they arrived at Barrier Restore, a featherlight serum that protects the complexion from external aggressors (such as over-cleansing, topical antimicrobials or antibiotics, daily wear and tear, or just plain aging) with plumping ceramides and soothing magnesium chloride to help to retain moisture. “We were hoping that if the barrier layer was supported, then good bacteria could thrive and communicate with the immune system to help heal the skin,” says Holey, who gave early batches of the product to the afflicted client. “When she came back a month later and her skin was perfect, we were like, ‘Everybody should have this!’ ”

Starting tomorrow, Barrier Restore Serum—as well as Holey and Nadeau’s Soothing B3 Serum, which controls inflammation with niacinamide and extracts also found in green tea, and their Intensive Repair Serum, a twice-weekly exfoliating gel that rebalances the skin’s bacterial composition to address stubborn breakouts—will be available.

As for going against her better judgment and entering into the competitive skin-care market, Holey has found a certain peace in knowing she’s filling a white space for highly active products that are effective while being clean and gentle. “Everyone I treat works really hard, and it doesn’t help to put something on their skin that could potentially contribute to the stress of the body,” she says. And there’s more good news for the over-scheduled masses yearning for clear skin: Holey and Nadeau are working on a full product line set to debut next year.

Expand

Kristina Holey + Marie Veronique Barrier Restore Serum, Soothing B3 Serum, and Intensive Repair Serum, available starting December 10 at marieveronique.com.

Photo: Courtesy of marieveronique.com

 

The post One of San Francisco’s Most In-Demand Facialists Debuts a Skin-Saving Product Collaboration appeared first on Vogue.

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One of San Francisco’s Most In-Demand Facialists Debuts a Skin-Saving Product Collaboration

facials

Despite the fact that she hand-mixes many of the masks and flower essences applied during her in-demand treatments, facialist Kristina Holey has never aspired to make her own products. “It’s super expensive, the market is so saturated, and I know how much work it would entail,” the Bay Area aesthetician says. But nine months ago, something happened that changed Holey’s mind: She started seeing a rise in perioral dermatitis among her clients.

The red cystic acne that occurs around the jaw is often due to a hormonal imbalance in women who go off birth control, are in their first trimester of pregnancy, or have just given birth, Holey explains. “Dermatologist-prescribed topical steroids clear up the dermatitis, but they also suppress immune function,” she continues, which can result in a loss of micronutrients that leave the skin’s barrier weakened—and vulnerable to pathogenic bacteria and inflammation. So while the prescription drugs will work for a few weeks, “the dermatitis comes back with a vengeance.”

When a longtime client came to Holey’s atelier looking for an alternative topical solution, Holey was compelled to consult product formulator Marie-Veronique Nadeau, the creator of the organic skin-care line Marie Veronique, whose Berkeley-based store had become a favorite beauty haunt for Holey. “We both have this weird passion for skin and we were just on the same page in terms of how we approach it,” says Nadeau, who launched her popular green beauty brand on the back of a cult-favorite tinted chemical-free zinc oxide sunscreen in 2002. “My approach has always been: ‘How would nature do this?’ ”

With clean, nontoxic, non-irritating ingredients in mind, the two women started testing different remedies targeting the skin’s barrier function (the top five layers of the stratum corneum) while also addressing inflammation. After a number of trials, they arrived at Barrier Restore, a featherlight serum that protects the complexion from external aggressors (such as over-cleansing, topical antimicrobials or antibiotics, daily wear and tear, or just plain aging) with plumping ceramides and soothing magnesium chloride to help to retain moisture. “We were hoping that if the barrier layer was supported, then good bacteria could thrive and communicate with the immune system to help heal the skin,” says Holey, who gave early batches of the product to the afflicted client. “When she came back a month later and her skin was perfect, we were like, ‘Everybody should have this!’ ”

Starting tomorrow, Barrier Restore Serum—as well as Holey and Nadeau’s Soothing B3 Serum, which controls inflammation with niacinamide and extracts also found in green tea, and their Intensive Repair Serum, a twice-weekly exfoliating gel that rebalances the skin’s bacterial composition to address stubborn breakouts—will be available.

As for going against her better judgment and entering into the competitive skin-care market, Holey has found a certain peace in knowing she’s filling a white space for highly active products that are effective while being clean and gentle. “Everyone I treat works really hard, and it doesn’t help to put something on their skin that could potentially contribute to the stress of the body,” she says. And there’s more good news for the over-scheduled masses yearning for clear skin: Holey and Nadeau are working on a full product line set to debut next year.

Expand

Kristina Holey + Marie Veronique Barrier Restore Serum, Soothing B3 Serum, and Intensive Repair Serum, available starting December 10 at marieveronique.com.

Photo: Courtesy of marieveronique.com

 

The post One of San Francisco’s Most In-Demand Facialists Debuts a Skin-Saving Product Collaboration appeared first on Vogue.

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Be the Bella Hadid of Your Break-Up By Taking the Stylish Upperhand

homepage-holding

It was the stuff of break-up folklore. Hooked into a glittering bustier with wings affixed to her lithe frame, model Bella Hadid floated down the Victoria’s Secret runway last week and right past her ex, The Weeknd, né Abel Tesfaye. Just weeks after their headline-making reported break-up, the former lovers were inches away from one another, the residue of heartbreak still fresh on them. Catching each other’s eyes, the emo troubadour and dark beauty exchanged knowing glances under the glittering halls of Paris’s Grand Palais, before Hadid lifted her wings, perhaps symbolizing her rising above the situation.

This meeting of exes seemed rife with tension (you could almost feel The Weeknd’s regret) but also had an undeniable grace. Bella, all of 20, handled one of the most unpleasant parts of dating with real maturity. True, the two were contractually obligated to share a space for the length of filming, but days later there was Bella again, name-checking and even thanking her pop-star ex in a heartfelt Instagram post. Appreciative of Tesfaye for lending his voice to the show’s star-studded soundtrack, Hadid wrote, “Thank you for being the best and most incredible performer on the planet. You KILLED it, as always.”

Accompanying a picture of their fateful run-in and peppered with emoji, the caption was either the perfect troll or a sincere sentiment. We’ll go with both. Regardless, it was safe to say that Hadid was winning their breakup by stylishly taking the upper hand.

It’s a difficult strategy to follow considering so often heartbreak can leave us bitter, jaded, and out for blood. Wanting to post anonymous missives about a cheating ex’s sex game on the Internet or leave all of their belongings strewn on the street outside your apartment building feels rather cathartic, but it’s a momentary pleasure. Soon enough you’re looking for a deeper sense of closure. Plus, ending a relationship with a violent outburst might leave your ex with a lasting impression—of, say, stalking his phone or throwing blunt objects at his head as he walks out the door. Better to be remembered for all your wonderful, nurturing qualities.

And the sad truth is leaving a relationship with your dignity intact is often the best way of creating a lasting image for him to wallow over. (To be sure, Tesfaye has lost sleep over his brush with a half-naked Hadid). As Hadid’s Instagram timeline has shown, the model has been using her timeline to try out and fastidiously document her new single lifestyle. Whether snapping a selfie of her chiseled six-pack or posting a reminder of her continued career success, Hadid appears like a woman who is truly above it all.

So if you’re also trying to find closure after a big breakup, why not slip on LNA’s Zimmer stretch-jersey sports bra with your Olympia Activewear silo cropped stretch leggings, and hit the gym? A jolt of endorphins will put you in better spirits. Gather your girls up for your first night out and slip on a Ban.do’s Strong Female Lead sweatshirt for an added boost of confidence. And for that fateful run-in, make sure to have him wanting more as you gracefully slip past him in your Paco Rabanne chain-mail-panel spaghetti-strap dress. Make sure to say “hello,” wish him well, and saunter off on the heels of those killer Balenciaga over-the-knee leather boots. It’s a look he won’t be able to get over.

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Victoria’s Secret metallic lace bodysuit, $78,
victoriassecret.com; Creole hoop earring with heart in 14 karat gold, $60,
target.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of victoriassecret.com; Courtesy of target.com

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Paco Rabanne chain-mail panel spaghetti-strap dress, $1,607, farfetch.com; Judith Leiber Couture large coffered rectangle clutch bag in silver jet multi, $4,495,
neimanmarcus.com; Tom Ford metallic textured-leather ankle boots, $745, net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of farfetch.com; Courtesy of Neiman Marcus; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Dior Timepieces la mini D De Dior satine watch, $4,950,
modaoperandi.com; Jacquemus ruffled lamé minidress, $541,
farfetch.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of modaoperandi.com; Courtesy of farfetch.com; Courtesy of Barneys

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

The Row coco suede 40 mm in black, $795,
neimanmarcus.com; Rebecca Vallance Orlando off-the-shoulder point d’esprit and crepe gown, $1,040,
net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top right) Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of Neiman Marcus

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Balenciaga all-time over-the-knee leather boots, price upon request, for information: matchesfashion.com; JYORK Jonny teal velvet, price upon request,
for information: jyorkthelabel.com; Kindred Black Hot Sex honey, $36,
kindredblack.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of kindredblack.com

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Marques ’ Almeida oversize asymmetrical quilted gilet, $549,
matchesfashion.com; LNA Zimmer stretch-jersey sports bra, $60,
theoutnet.com; Olympia Activewear silo cropped stretch-jersey leggings, $54,
net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of theoutnet.com; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Mango faux-fur jacket, $100,
shop.mango.com;
Loewe puzzle large X-ray printed leather tote, $4,890,
mytheresa.com; Ban.do strong female lead sweatshirt, price upon request, for information: bando.com; Zara leather heeled ankle boots with bow, $139,
zara.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of shop.mango.com; Courtesy of mytheresa.com; Courtesy of bando.com; Courtesy of zara.com

 

The post Be the Bella Hadid of Your Break-Up By Taking the Stylish Upperhand appeared first on Vogue.

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Be the Bella Hadid of Your Break-Up By Taking the Stylish Upperhand

homepage-holding

It was the stuff of break-up folklore. Hooked into a glittering bustier with wings affixed to her lithe frame, model Bella Hadid floated down the Victoria’s Secret runway last week and right past her ex, The Weeknd, né Abel Tesfaye. Just weeks after their headline-making reported break-up, the former lovers were inches away from one another, the residue of heartbreak still fresh on them. Catching each other’s eyes, the emo troubadour and dark beauty exchanged knowing glances under the glittering halls of Paris’s Grand Palais, before Hadid lifted her wings, perhaps symbolizing her rising above the situation.

This meeting of exes seemed rife with tension (you could almost feel The Weeknd’s regret) but also had an undeniable grace. Bella, all of 20, handled one of the most unpleasant parts of dating with real maturity. True, the two were contractually obligated to share a space for the length of filming, but days later there was Bella again, name-checking and even thanking her pop-star ex in a heartfelt Instagram post. Appreciative of Tesfaye for lending his voice to the show’s star-studded soundtrack, Hadid wrote, “Thank you for being the best and most incredible performer on the planet. You KILLED it, as always.”

Accompanying a picture of their fateful run-in and peppered with emoji, the caption was either the perfect troll or a sincere sentiment. We’ll go with both. Regardless, it was safe to say that Hadid was winning their breakup by stylishly taking the upper hand.

It’s a difficult strategy to follow considering so often heartbreak can leave us bitter, jaded, and out for blood. Wanting to post anonymous missives about a cheating ex’s sex game on the Internet or leave all of their belongings strewn on the street outside your apartment building feels rather cathartic, but it’s a momentary pleasure. Soon enough you’re looking for a deeper sense of closure. Plus, ending a relationship with a violent outburst might leave your ex with a lasting impression—of, say, stalking his phone or throwing blunt objects at his head as he walks out the door. Better to be remembered for all your wonderful, nurturing qualities.

And the sad truth is leaving a relationship with your dignity intact is often the best way of creating a lasting image for him to wallow over. (To be sure, Tesfaye has lost sleep over his brush with a half-naked Hadid). As Hadid’s Instagram timeline has shown, the model has been using her timeline to try out and fastidiously document her new single lifestyle. Whether snapping a selfie of her chiseled six-pack or posting a reminder of her continued career success, Hadid appears like a woman who is truly above it all.

So if you’re also trying to find closure after a big breakup, why not slip on LNA’s Zimmer stretch-jersey sports bra with your Olympia Activewear silo cropped stretch leggings, and hit the gym? A jolt of endorphins will put you in better spirits. Gather your girls up for your first night out and slip on a Ban.do’s Strong Female Lead sweatshirt for an added boost of confidence. And for that fateful run-in, make sure to have him wanting more as you gracefully slip past him in your Paco Rabanne chain-mail-panel spaghetti-strap dress. Make sure to say “hello,” wish him well, and saunter off on the heels of those killer Balenciaga over-the-knee leather boots. It’s a look he won’t be able to get over.

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Victoria’s Secret metallic lace bodysuit, $78,
victoriassecret.com; Creole hoop earring with heart in 14 karat gold, $60,
target.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of victoriassecret.com; Courtesy of target.com

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Paco Rabanne chain-mail panel spaghetti-strap dress, $1,607, farfetch.com; Judith Leiber Couture large coffered rectangle clutch bag in silver jet multi, $4,495,
neimanmarcus.com; Tom Ford metallic textured-leather ankle boots, $745, net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of farfetch.com; Courtesy of Neiman Marcus; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Dior Timepieces la mini D De Dior satine watch, $4,950,
modaoperandi.com; Jacquemus ruffled lamé minidress, $541,
farfetch.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of modaoperandi.com; Courtesy of farfetch.com; Courtesy of Barneys

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

The Row coco suede 40 mm in black, $795,
neimanmarcus.com; Rebecca Vallance Orlando off-the-shoulder point d’esprit and crepe gown, $1,040,
net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top right) Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of Neiman Marcus

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Balenciaga all-time over-the-knee leather boots, price upon request, for information: matchesfashion.com; JYORK Jonny teal velvet, price upon request,
for information: jyorkthelabel.com; Kindred Black Hot Sex honey, $36,
kindredblack.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of kindredblack.com

Expand

Photo: Courtesy of Bella Hadid / @bellahadid

Expand

Marques ’ Almeida oversize asymmetrical quilted gilet, $549,
matchesfashion.com; LNA Zimmer stretch-jersey sports bra, $60,
theoutnet.com; Olympia Activewear silo cropped stretch-jersey leggings, $54,
net-a-porter.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of theoutnet.com; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com

Expand

Photo: Getty Images

Expand

Mango faux-fur jacket, $100,
shop.mango.com;
Loewe puzzle large X-ray printed leather tote, $4,890,
mytheresa.com; Ban.do strong female lead sweatshirt, price upon request, for information: bando.com; Zara leather heeled ankle boots with bow, $139,
zara.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of shop.mango.com; Courtesy of mytheresa.com; Courtesy of bando.com; Courtesy of zara.com

 

The post Be the Bella Hadid of Your Break-Up By Taking the Stylish Upperhand appeared first on Vogue.

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Why Restaurant-Lighting Makeup Is the Ultimate Date Night Beauty Hack

Photographed by Josh Olins

There are many things upon which a positive dining experience hinges, including, but not limited to, ordering well, the proper preparation, and the right company. Whether you realize it or not, good lighting should also be on this list. “Some restaurants light from the floor to crest ambiance, which is the worst for your skin because it makes it look dark and ruddy,” says makeup artist Francelle Daly, revealing just one of many potential beauty pitfalls that can occur from a subpar restaurant-lightning design. High-wattage overhead bulbs are no better. “They can exacerbate shadows on the face including dark under-eye circles or blemishes,” confirms Erin Parsons, Gigi Hadid’s go-to face painter.

It’s a dilemma that beauty enthusiasts have been facing for years: When Japanese engineers replaced the warmth of gas lamps with electrical lighting at many of Tokyo’s best restaurants around the turn of the last century, the unflattering effects rattled the city’s geisha community. So, in 1917, Shiseido created a cosmetic solution to counterbalance the harsh glare: color-correcting dusts that promised to reduce redness and sallowness, while adding face-flattering highlights. This month, the brand has rereleased the seven-piece collection of sheer pink, lavender, peony, peach, yellow, white, and green powders, which offer one way to make sure LED sconces don’t ruin your holiday date night plans. Here, Daly, Parsons, and Shiseido’s artistic director, Dick Page, offer a few other tips and tricks for creating a flattering candlelit glow, even under fluorescents.

Correct With Caution
While color correctors are your friend when it comes to poor lighting, you want to err on the side of subtlety when indulging in them, says Page, which is why he appreciates the “foolproof” transparency of Shiseido’s 7 Color Powders Revival Centennial Edition. “The idea [with these] is to just buff on a little highlight,” he says—not to strobe with unnecessary “triangles of light.” A simple wash of lavender will provide a nice incandescence on the top of cheekbones when applied before blush; pink will add “little points of illumination” along the brow ridge and the Cupid’s bow of lips; and the peach shade creates what Page calls “a general instant health effect” when dusted around the hairline and across the bridge of the nose.

Pull Out Your Smartphone
Applying an eyeshadow primer with a little shimmer, like Edward Bess’s Illuminating Eyeshadow Base, on the eyelid will help create a highlight around lids, says Daly, who also likes to bring her concealer directly underneath the bottom lash line to erase any natural redness that reads more readily under bad lighting. Daly’s other pro tip: “Use your iPhone light as a guide to reapply your makeup,” she suggests, pointing out that the device’s strong white beam will offer a preview of what could be visible from across the dinner table.

Think Light and Bright
Parsons prefers to stick to reflective foundations, like Armani’s Luminous Silk Foundation, to brighten the skin. She also suggests going easy on bronzer and contours, as orange tones can absorb cool blue light making heavy applications of sculpting products look “muddy.” And as red and pink lipsticks may appear deeper in overhead lighting, Parsons recommends picking hydrating statement bullets with vibrancy, like Hourglass Velvet Crème Lipstick in Icon.

Fashion Editor: Alex Harrington
Hair: Tamas Tuzes
Makeup: Maki Ryoke
Special Thanks: Kimpton Ink48 Hotel

 

The post Why Restaurant-Lighting Makeup Is the Ultimate Date Night Beauty Hack appeared first on Vogue.

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Why Restaurant-Lighting Makeup Is the Ultimate Date Night Beauty Hack

Photographed by Josh Olins

There are many things upon which a positive dining experience hinges, including, but not limited to, ordering well, the proper preparation, and the right company. Whether you realize it or not, good lighting should also be on this list. “Some restaurants light from the floor to crest ambiance, which is the worst for your skin because it makes it look dark and ruddy,” says makeup artist Francelle Daly, revealing just one of many potential beauty pitfalls that can occur from a subpar restaurant-lightning design. High-wattage overhead bulbs are no better. “They can exacerbate shadows on the face including dark under-eye circles or blemishes,” confirms Erin Parsons, Gigi Hadid’s go-to face painter.

It’s a dilemma that beauty enthusiasts have been facing for years: When Japanese engineers replaced the warmth of gas lamps with electrical lighting at many of Tokyo’s best restaurants around the turn of the last century, the unflattering effects rattled the city’s geisha community. So, in 1917, Shiseido created a cosmetic solution to counterbalance the harsh glare: color-correcting dusts that promised to reduce redness and sallowness, while adding face-flattering highlights. This month, the brand has rereleased the seven-piece collection of sheer pink, lavender, peony, peach, yellow, white, and green powders, which offer one way to make sure LED sconces don’t ruin your holiday date night plans. Here, Daly, Parsons, and Shiseido’s artistic director, Dick Page, offer a few other tips and tricks for creating a flattering candlelit glow, even under fluorescents.

Correct With Caution
While color correctors are your friend when it comes to poor lighting, you want to err on the side of subtlety when indulging in them, says Page, which is why he appreciates the “foolproof” transparency of Shiseido’s 7 Color Powders Revival Centennial Edition. “The idea [with these] is to just buff on a little highlight,” he says—not to strobe with unnecessary “triangles of light.” A simple wash of lavender will provide a nice incandescence on the top of cheekbones when applied before blush; pink will add “little points of illumination” along the brow ridge and the Cupid’s bow of lips; and the peach shade creates what Page calls “a general instant health effect” when dusted around the hairline and across the bridge of the nose.

Pull Out Your Smartphone
Applying an eyeshadow primer with a little shimmer, like Edward Bess’s Illuminating Eyeshadow Base, on the eyelid will help create a highlight around lids, says Daly, who also likes to bring her concealer directly underneath the bottom lash line to erase any natural redness that reads more readily under bad lighting. Daly’s other pro tip: “Use your iPhone light as a guide to reapply your makeup,” she suggests, pointing out that the device’s strong white beam will offer a preview of what could be visible from across the dinner table.

Think Light and Bright
Parsons prefers to stick to reflective foundations, like Armani’s Luminous Silk Foundation, to brighten the skin. She also suggests going easy on bronzer and contours, as orange tones can absorb cool blue light making heavy applications of sculpting products look “muddy.” And as red and pink lipsticks may appear deeper in overhead lighting, Parsons recommends picking hydrating statement bullets with vibrancy, like Hourglass Velvet Crème Lipstick in Icon.

Fashion Editor: Alex Harrington
Hair: Tamas Tuzes
Makeup: Maki Ryoke
Special Thanks: Kimpton Ink48 Hotel

 

The post Why Restaurant-Lighting Makeup Is the Ultimate Date Night Beauty Hack appeared first on Vogue.

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Jennifer Lawrence Sheds Light on the Sexy Side of Floral Prints

Jennifer Lawrence

In the swirl of promotion surrounding her new film, the sci-fi thriller Passengers (which opens on December 21), Jennifer Lawrence has turned her red carpet appearances into her own fashion-forward runway show. Earlier today, the 26-year-old appeared in an Altuzarra cherry-print cami—a clever play on the sweet runway variety seen at Dolce & Gabbana and Moschino. Her moody floral skirt, meanwhile, picked up on motifs favored by Oscar de la Renta and Giambattista Valli. It was a bit of a departure in tone for Lawrence, who was recently seen in Dior’s Princess top and ball skirt and Proenza Schouler’s red-and-black ’70s-inspired dress.

The sultry nature of Lawrence’s top was offset by its girlish print. Similarly, her pleated skirt benefits from a ladylike touch through the use of organza. Completing the rest of the look were equally dainty yet impactful accessories: a delicate necklace, thin bangle, and strappy heeled peep-toes. Consider this one of the starlet’s most stellar looks so far.

 

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Jennifer Lawrence Sheds Light on the Sexy Side of Floral Prints

Jennifer Lawrence

In the swirl of promotion surrounding her new film, the sci-fi thriller Passengers (which opens on December 21), Jennifer Lawrence has turned her red carpet appearances into her own fashion-forward runway show. Earlier today, the 26-year-old appeared in an Altuzarra cherry-print cami—a clever play on the sweet runway variety seen at Dolce & Gabbana and Moschino. Her moody floral skirt, meanwhile, picked up on motifs favored by Oscar de la Renta and Giambattista Valli. It was a bit of a departure in tone for Lawrence, who was recently seen in Dior’s Princess top and ball skirt and Proenza Schouler’s red-and-black ’70s-inspired dress.

The sultry nature of Lawrence’s top was offset by its girlish print. Similarly, her pleated skirt benefits from a ladylike touch through the use of organza. Completing the rest of the look were equally dainty yet impactful accessories: a delicate necklace, thin bangle, and strappy heeled peep-toes. Consider this one of the starlet’s most stellar looks so far.

 

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Andra Day’s Prescription for Holiday Glamour? Red Lips and Hydrate

Andra Day

Andra Day, the terrifically talented Grammy-nominated jazz singer, is known for working a retro ’40s style—“lazy pin-up” is how she’s described her casual look, and she’s named Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Lucille Ball as inspirations. But make no mistake about it, Day is a thoroughly modern muse who was featured in Marc Jacobs’s Spring campaign.

Last night she gave a private performance in Dallas in the new Forty Five Ten boutique, which is filled to the brim with couture pieces and the buzziest ready-to-wear labels. Day stood out in a red satin ensemble trimmed with marabou that had the ease of pajama dressing and full-on silver screen glamour, created, she told us, by Bishme Cromartie—buyers take note!—whom she met through her stylist and has designed her Cheers to the Fall tour outfits. “I think he’s fantastic,” Day enthused. “I’m obsessed with young designers; their hunger and the different things they bring to the table.”

Asked how to deliver holiday style the Andra Day way, the singer replied: “Red lips for the holidays; nothing else matters. Hydrate and red lips.”

 

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Andra Day’s Prescription for Holiday Glamour? Red Lips and Hydrate

Andra Day

Andra Day, the terrifically talented Grammy-nominated jazz singer, is known for working a retro ’40s style—“lazy pin-up” is how she’s described her casual look, and she’s named Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Lucille Ball as inspirations. But make no mistake about it, Day is a thoroughly modern muse who was featured in Marc Jacobs’s Spring campaign.

Last night she gave a private performance in Dallas in the new Forty Five Ten boutique, which is filled to the brim with couture pieces and the buzziest ready-to-wear labels. Day stood out in a red satin ensemble trimmed with marabou that had the ease of pajama dressing and full-on silver screen glamour, created, she told us, by Bishme Cromartie—buyers take note!—whom she met through her stylist and has designed her Cheers to the Fall tour outfits. “I think he’s fantastic,” Day enthused. “I’m obsessed with young designers; their hunger and the different things they bring to the table.”

Asked how to deliver holiday style the Andra Day way, the singer replied: “Red lips for the holidays; nothing else matters. Hydrate and red lips.”

 

The post Andra Day’s Prescription for Holiday Glamour? Red Lips and Hydrate appeared first on Vogue.

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